Book Review: $100 Startup by Chris Guillebeau

Chris is an entrepreneur and author, who spends the majority of his time traveling the world, interviewing other entrepreneurs, and hosting the World Domination Summit (a gathering of creative people).

 The book was published in 2012, and contains stories from over 50 different entrepreneurs, as we learn their startup lessons. The key lesson that Chris tries to get across is that you don’t need large sums of money to get started and you don’t need to turn your startup into a giant, multi-billion dollar enterprise. Most of the people in the book are satisfied with smaller operations (often 1-person), which fulfills their needs and allows them to pursue the work and lifestyle which they want.

 The first part of the book covers basic stories of people who became entrepreneurs. It covers how individuals got their ideas, how they worked to make get the business off the ground, and some of the ways they found to succeed. One of the key points that Chris emphasizes in the book is the idea of value – how you need to provide value to potential clients in order to succeed.

 The second part of the book goes into more details of how to start and succeed in your small business. It talks about simple, one-page business plans, startup/launches, and using everything possible to self-promote the business. It also has some interesting ideas on how to fundraise (including the story of how one business got started with a car loan when the owners couldn’t get a business loan).

 The final part of the book covers some steps you can take in order to grow your business and take it to the next level. He talks about leverage, how to franchise, and getting as big as you want (but no bigger). He finishes up with a chapter on “what happens if you fail” in which he talks about several entrepreneurs who failed their first and even second time before finally making it. The key is to persevere.

 A lot of the items covered have been dealt with before, and his writing tends to gloss over many of the details the reader might wish were covered in more depth. Overall, I’d give the book 3 stars out of 5

 

 

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