Stuff…

Too much stuff!

Like many reformed FIRE people, I have looked into the whole “minimalism” concept, and all the people who cheered for the idea. I can see how seductive it is, because many of us have reached a point where we can see that “stuff” doesn’t really buy happiness. Like a lot of you, my home is full of items I bought at one point in time, intending to use it a great deal, only to find that I rarely (if ever) used the item.

Mrs. 39 Months is much worse than I am. We have a bedroom which I have built shelving for and which holds nothing but box-after-box of her things (old clothes, papers from college, arts & crafts tools, etc.). I joke with her that she will end up on an episode of hoarders sometime.

At the same time, both of us frown on the whole “minimalist” movement, with folks living with “100 items” and competing with each other to see who can “out-minimal” each other. Life is to be enjoyed, and part of that is to have things that bring you joy. In addition, for those of us who live in areas that have major weather swings (100 degree humid months and 12 inch snow months) you need to have some items. We both have hobbies we enjoy (woodworking, knitting, music, etc.) so again – if the item brings you joy, don’t automatically toss it.

The one area that I can understand (and sometimes indulge in myself) are books. One of the “fun” things we do is go to Barnes & Noble, drink coffee and read – and typically buy books. Our home is choke-full of books, about 80% of them being hers. They lie all over the house, half-read and stacked on each other on any available flat surface. Still, it’s a relatively benign addiction, with the potential to provide years of comfort as we retire. Better than blowing it at the craps table!

As we approach FI and the potential of moving somewhere better for our retirement lifestyle (you just can’t retire in New Jersey, due to expenses) the thought of wading through these items and determining what stays and what goes fills both of us with dread. I figure I have one “move” left in Mrs.39 Months, so wherever we go, we will end up staying there. Of course that brings up the quest of where that “one point” is.

That is a topic for another time.

 

Mr. 39 Months

Frugal Win – fixing your own stuff!

One of the interesting sub-plots in the FI community is the number of people actively working on ways to “out-Frugal” the next person, or as Mrs. 39 Months calls it, being “more frugal than thou.” Its all in good fun as we all travel different paths to our final destination.

When I was younger and not making as much, I often did most of the construction work around the house (deck, bathroom remodel, kitchen remodel, electrical, etc.). I had a detached garage (that flooded) that was my shop, and I tried to build minor bits of furniture (mostly bookshelves) and other things. While, one of the things I never got the hang of was repairing the items that I had. It didn’t help that a lot of the tools I had were not the best.

As you get older, more frugal, and have a little more time on your hands, it starts to be kind of fun to try to fix something, instead of just contributing to consumer culture, tossing the old one out, and buying a newer, cheap  version of it.

When we first moved in 20+ years ago, my father bought me black & decker workmate, one of those basic tools that it seems like every homeowner in the US has. Good for setting up around the home, doing basic tasks, etc. I used that thing a lot over the last 20 years (look at the top, with its paint, saw cuts, holes, etc.). About 10 years ago, one of the parts supporting the leg in its “up” position broke, and the leg just dangled after that.

It didn’t really affect the workmate when it was up, the leg was in its regular position, but when I went to set it up, or put it up, it flopped around and made the setup a little challenging. About a month ago I decided to find the required part online (found the item master list, identified the part, ordered in and got it delivered). Part and shipping was less than $5. After about 5 min of work taking out the old part and re-installing the new one, I had a perfectly functional workmate. Made me realize what an idiot I was for letting it sit like this for 10+ years.

Nothing major, no great victories, but at least one less item in the landfill, and a great feeling of accomplishment. OK, so what’s next? Maybe take apart that weed whacker that has been sitting in the shed forever…..

 

Have you fixed up anything instead of just buying something new?

 

Mr. 39 Months