Year of Saying “Yes”

A very good article from Leftover Dollars on their “Year of Saying Yes.” Basically, they had a loved one who passed away after an illness of 2-1/2 years. That person had lead a rough life, without a lot of funds, and at the end, even when they had the opportunity, they chose not to spend money or time trying to experience or enjoy parts of their life that they had expressed an interest in. They maintained their “I don’t have enough money” attitude all the way up to the end.

Leftover Dollar noted that the experience of watching this “played a huge role in my FIRE journey.” Because of LD’s childhood, she was a natural saver and very frugal, so even as things went well and money became available, purchases and lifestyle inflation was put off, due to a fear of being broke “and scared of the chaos that ensues when the money runs out at the wrong time.”

I’m not sure how many folks in the FIRE community pursue it due to deep emotions on poverty and not having enough money (probably a significant portion). In this case, LD used her loved one’s final situation as motivation to start “saying yes” to all the things she wanted to do, but had been holding out on. She sought out a new job because she didn’t enjoy her current one. She traveled, visited old friend, and embraced life. “Basically, whenever an opportunity arose that I really felt would enrich my life or satiate some longstanding curiosity, is said yes. I acknowledged that I could afford it and made it fit into my budget.”

Its an excellent read, and I suggest you take a look if you have the time.

How many of us are holding back while pursuing FI, trying to put in that last dollar into our retirement funds? How many things have you passed up, even though you wanted to? While I definitely don’t embrace the “YOLO” lifestyle (you only live once), Mrs. 39 Months and I have done our share of traveling, spending and generally enjoying life. I came late to the FIRE movement – I only got to saving 40%+  of my income in the last couple of years. Before that, it was more like 20%.

Still, I find as we get closer, I’ve had the urge to say “yes” to a lot more. Once we hit our FI goal (8 more months?) I plan on saying “yes” a lot more often.

How about you?

Mr. 39 Months

Frugal Tip – Another instance of doing some of your own home repairs

In light of my recent failure to take care of my home items, I thought I would take the chance to show that, yes I can do stuff around the house that helps keep our costs down. Doing your own home repair work and home maintenance is an excellent way to reduce your costs, live frugally, and learn some skills that you could, conceivably, turn into a side hustle as you move towards FI.

In this case, one of our toilets has been slowly leaking over time, leading to small amounts of water on the floor. This has caused some issues with the trim, and if not dealt with, could cause issues with the subfloor/flooring as we move forward. Better to jump on this now when the issue is minor.

My brother in law was a handyman/carpenter for most of his adult life, and I had the chance to work with him for a couple of months when I have first gotten out of the military. One of the things he told me was that replacing a toilet was easy, and once you had replaced three, you knew everything you needed to know and could do it with ease. “The problem is that most folks never replace three toilets in their lifetime” he said. He also commented that this was true with most home repairs/fixes – installing flooring, cabinetry, etc.

There is a great wealth of information through books and on the internet in reference to home repairs, so I’d urge everyone to consider it before they pay someone a lot of money to do some of the basic stuff.

In my case, I went and bought a $150 toilet at the local home repair store, about $40 of additional items needed, and read a bit on how to do it (I’ve replaced one before, but wanted to catch back up). Then it was on to the process.

  1. Turn off supply & drain the tank
  2. Remove nuts, lift off tank and toilet bowl
  3. Put wax seal on new toilet and install on floor with washer & nuts
  4. Attach tank and hardware (don’t tighten too much)
  5. Re-attach supply, fill tank & test for leaks
  6. Attach the toilet seat

Overall, the process was done in about an hour, and so far no issues. Saved probably $250 in the cost for a plumber to do it – it wasn’t very complicated. You just had to be willing to get a little dirty (not with crap, but with the wax seal, water, etc.)

Any experiences on your part doing home handyman work?

Mr. 39 Months

Frugal Tip – taking advantage of business travel

One of the things you often read in our community is people’s love of travel. Some folks make it a full-time career once they hit FI! For those of us still working, we sometimes get selected for business travel.

My father was an engineer in Oak Ridge, TN (where they helped make the atomic bombs) and did extensive business travel all over the US. One of the things he told us near the end of his life was the regrets that he had, that in all his travels he did not take an extra day or two off, and see the sights of the local areas that he visited. The company spent all that money to send him to these places – and he did not take advantage of the free travel.

I have tried to take that to heart in my business travels. As an industrial engineer in the logistics industry, I have had the chance to travel to about 20 different states, and some of the major cities of the US (LA, Portland, Denver, Dallas, Orlando, Miami, Boston, etc.) and done international travel to Canada and Sweden. Not only has this enabled me to rack up some airline and hotel miles, but also I have tried to take advantage of the site seeing opportunities.

I have even had the benefit of taking Mrs. 39 Months along with me. We have traveled to Orlando, Portland OR, and a few other places where she has been able to go see the sites, and I have done my work.

Recently I had to travel down to Miami for a warehousing conveyor project (it is not going that well) and had time to run around for half a day on Sunday. I hit Miami’s south beach, sampled a lot of Cuban cuisine, and toured an interesting house down there called Vizcaya. It’s a mansion built in 1920 to look like an Italian villa, for one of the founders of the John Deere Company. Nice gardens, nice home, a lot to recommend it if you happen to be in Miami.

Hope your travels go well this holiday season

Mr. 39 Months

Mr. 39 Months Mom takes a trip….

And you thought travel was just for FIRE folks?

I owe an awful lot to my mother, like most of us. She helped form my character, assisted me in getting a start in life, and provided loving (though sometimes critical) support. She also was an excellent example of how to live a life of abundance and frugality.

We grew up in the upper middle-class, with my stepfather and mother both management professionals that earned a good, but not fantastic wage. We never had to go without, but at the same time, we never had the latest toy or gadget. When we reached the age to drive, there was a third car, the old beater car that we inherited after our Mom got a new one. We had clothes, plenty of food, and the opportunity to try new hobbies and interests, but again – never a lot of new, hip stuff.

We all got jobs when we hit 16, so that we could earn our own money (and spent a lot of it on gas for the beater, since it was expensive then). Our college wasn’t paid for us, we had to get scholarships, and work through our college years to pay for it (as well as take out loans). I’m aware that the price of college back then was much less than it is now, I’m just pointing out that it was not expected for the parents to assist at that time.

After we left the nest, my stepfather and mother traveled a lot, but they also saved a lot, not spending more than they took in, and living a fun but frugal life.  Well, my mother is now in 81, and after my stepfather passed early this year, she chose to get back out and travel. She signed up for a 2-week cruise around the Greek islands, and took off in early October.

She just got back this weekend, and in talking to her, she really enjoyed herself. While she wasn’t as mobile as they were in the past, she did get to see a lot of stuff, and met some new people who took her “under their wing” as they ran around. While she isn’t sure about international travel going forward, she still plans to travel more. In fact, she’s coming up to see me in New Jersey and my brother in Vermont for Christmas. On the road again…..

Why do I write about this? Just to remind everyone to plan for the long term, because you are going to stay healthy and want to run around for a long time. Be ready and enjoy it!

Mr. 39 Months

Frugal Fail – Not taking care of your stuff

Members of the FI community are always looking for ways to cut expenses and costs, without jeopardizing their lifestyle. For many, it’s a source of pride that they can be as frugal as possible, while still enjoying life. Here at Mr. 39 Months, I’ve worked hard to get our expenses in line, generate a surplus, and then use that surplus to move us towards our goal – financial independence.

As part of that, I do a lot of my own stuff around the house (home repairs & remodeling, gardening, shopping, and moving the lawn). Its in mowing the lawn where I had my “frugal fail.”

The yard needed mowing this week, so out came the mower, I gassed it up, and got ready to go. We only have about ¼ acre of ground, so its less than an hours worth of work. Still, it saves my $75/month during the season (the basic cost of a lawn service). So off I went…..

Unfortunately, I had not taken the time to check the oil – and in fact I hadn’t checked it the last several times that I mowed the lawn. Everything went well for about 15 minutes, and then the machine just died on me. It completely stopped. When I tried to restart, the whole thing was frozen up – even the pull cord was stuck. Nothing.

It was then that I realized I hadn’t properly oiled it. When I checked it, it was bone dry (or pretty close). I had just ruined the motor on the thing.

I’ve taken it to a repair shop, even though I am pretty sure its toast. I hate the idea of just “junking” something and just buying new (our “throwaway” culture), and I have actually had the thing repaired once already when its transmission went (its pretty old). They are looking at it, but the prognosis isn’t good.

To get a mower that is the equivalent is roughly $400. I’ve heard that many people in the US can’t handle an emergency of $400 or more. While we can, it just goes to show you – take care of your stuff! It will save you a lot of money as you go through life.

Good Luck

Mr. 39 Months

Frugal win – doing your own minor home repairs

Well Mrs. 39 Months is out for week (she is doing a craft-related project with friends up in Vermont with my brother and his wife). So I’m a bachelor for the week. My grocery shopping consisted of a cart full of meat (steak, pork, chicken) and ice cream. I did purchase some fruit and broccoli as well, so I’m not a complete nut. The pets have been a little traumatized – they are used to me being gone for the week on business, but not my wife. Still, things are going OK.

When we remodeled the house ten years ago, we added a half-story to our rancher to make it sort of a “cape cod” kind of house. Our bedroom is now on the second floor, and we have a separate heating and cooling unit for it. Unfortunately, our AC guy, for some reason, thought water flowed uphill, so in the summer when we cranked up the AC (about 5 months after construction was done) it started leaking over our ceiling (the AC unit is in the attic). Ruined some drywall.

The construction guys came back in, fixed the AC issue, and put in drywall, but only put on the mud coat. Never came back (we were already occupying the bedroom, and it was difficult scheduling all of it). So for the last ten years, we have been living with a plain sheet of drywall over the bed, with its mud coat alone – and un-sanded. The problem has been that we were never in a situation where we could clear out the bedroom and do the work – Mrs. 39 Months didn’t like the idea of setting up temporarily somewhere else in the house.

Well, now that she is gone, I’ve decided to do the work, which consists of:

  • Clearing out the existing space (Mon)
  • Putting down tarps and protecting other surfaces (Mon)
  • Sanding/scraping the old drywall compound (Mon)
  • Priming the surfaces (Tue)
  • Putting on 2 coats of paint (Wed)

Its not work that I (or most other people) enjoy. Still, I had the chance, and rather than spend money to have someone else do the work, I chose to tackle it myself. I’ve already got a lot of the tools (rollers, scrapers, brushes, etc.). About $70 for some of the materials (paint, spackle, primer) and I was ready to go. Moved everything out (I have been sleeping on the ground in our family room) got it setup and off we go.

Doing a ceiling is a little rough on the arms, but not too bad. As of last night, I was done, and checking in this morning it appeared the ceiling was fairly close to the existing color. I knew I couldn’t get it perfect, but I’m pretty happy with where we are. Hopefully Mrs. 39 Months will like it we she gets back Friday night.

Mr. 39 Months

Do you have your emergency kit setup?

The FIRE community is very big on self-sufficiency and taking care of yourself, not just financially, but with a host of other things. Some folks have embraced farming (Frugalwoods, etc.), some energy independence (solar, wind, etc.), others have embraced RV/small home living. I have written before about farming/growing your own food. We all seem to want to reduce our living expenses/effort and to reduce our footprint on the planet. It is a noble goal.

Well as June starts to wind down and July starts to hit, Hurricane season starts in the Eastern US. Depending on where you live, this could be a minor, or a major cause for concern. In May I traveled to Texas, during my time there, they had torrential rainstorms, and a tornado touched down about 12 miles from where I was. The Midwest has been having severe flooding, and of course, the state of California is always trying to kill you (wildfires, earthquakes, mudslides, etc.). If we are concerned about self-sufficiency, we also need to be concerned about how we handle ourselves with life’s emergencies.

Most folks do not realize that FEMA (US Federal Emergency Management Association) states that folks need to be prepared to take care of themselves for the first 72 hours of an emergency. This makes sense, as it takes time to get the emergency machine in gear and materials on site. I will not forget when hurricane Sandy hit the New York/New Jersey area. We had several days’ notice, but some folks decided to stay in their homes, and there were people who 12 hours after the storm passed were on TV complaining that they did not have any food, any power, any gas, etc. What were they doing for the 2 days prior to the storm hitting?

You owe it to yourself to be prepared for things that might pop up. The internet and numerous books are full of information on what to do in survival situations, but I thought I would cover a few.

Things you will need to plan on

  1. Ways to stay warm. If your body drops below a certain temperature, you die – plain and simple. Depending on where you are, you will need to plan to either stay in place/living in your current domicile, without power for heat. If you have to flee, you will need blankets or sleeping bags, and a structure (car, tent, etc.) to live in.
  2. Water: So much of our world revolves around this liquid, and many people are unaware. Not just to drink, but to prepare meals, wash dishes and clothes, and to flush the toilet. If you are going to stay in place, before the disaster hits, fill your tub (the one you shower in) with water. You can use it to drink, wash and flush. If you have to leave, make sure you bring plenty of water for drinking/sanitation purposes. Estimate a minimum of a gallon per person, per day.
  3. Food: Stock up on non-perishable foods (i.e. do not have to be refrigerated). Assume you will lose power, or will not be able to refrigerate on the road while fleeing the scene. Plan to be able to subsist for at least a week. Have an alternative way to cook. Mrs. 39 Months and I have a camper stove that works on both propane and unleaded gas.
  4. First Aid Supplies: You probably cannot plan for everything, but basic first aid kits (for bumps, bruises, minor injuries, etc.) will be necessary. One thing many people forget is to make sure they have sufficient supplies of the medicine they need.
  5. Other: Do not forget your pets for supplies (food, water, medicine) as well as for warmth and transport (pet carriers) if you have to flee. In addition, toys for the kids and anything else you might need to help keep everyone calm.

Again, the internet is full of ideas on how to deal with potential issues. Take the time to do some basic preparation, and you will feel a lot better in the months ahead, as the news tries to scare the dickens out of you.

Mr. 39 Months

Frugal Win – Gardening

As folks in the community work towards their financial independence, they work on all sorts of ways to reduce their need to spend money. From less expensive cars, to renewable energy, to smaller homes, we explore ways to reduce our costs and move closer to financial independence. Heck, some of us bike to work for gosh sakes!

One of the ways you can help reduce costs is to produce some of your own food. The Frugalwoods actually went to go live on a farm and work to do this for themselves! Here at Casa 39 Months we are a little more low key. We have some spring vegetables that we like to eat (Brocolli, Califlower, Cabbage) and some Summer Vegetables we like (Squash, Tomatoes, etc.) so we set up three raised beds in a corner of the yard to raise them.

The build wasn’t hard. I went and purchased some 8ft 2×12 and 2×4 lumber at the local store, as well as some 3-1/2” deck screws. I then cut some of the 2x12s into 24” lengths with a handsaw (you could also use a powered circular saw) and built up a 2ft x 8ft box. I cut up the 2x4s into 24” lengths and put them inside to screw the 2x12s into – that way it was all screwed together and solid.

To fill that in, I put in a bunch of “Mel’s Mix” which is the gardening fill that Mel Bartholomew developed for his square foot gardening method (see below). Its consists of:

  • 1/3 Compost/Manure
  • 1/3 Peat Moss
  • 1/3 Vermiculite

Note: this is a highly productive mix. It can be updated in the following years by buying some parts of it and refilling the beds.

Once full, I planted this spring’s crops, one set of seeds every square foot. Its taken some time to weed and water (though the year has been wet so far) and we seem to be having some crops grow! I forgot to space out my planting (plant some this week, plant some later) so they’d mature at different rates. Still, we’ve had success in the past, and look forward to eating our own vegetables this year. Another way to get “off the grid” more.

Some books that I think help with the topic

  • Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew: Great book on how to grow a lot in a small space
  • Grow or Die by David the Good: Good book on how to “just get started” gardening

Happy Dirt Digging!

Mr. 39 Months

How is backpacking like personal finance?

“Backing” in the US started as a recreational pursuit primarily after World War II. While folks did camp out years before that, it was primarily car camping, or actual camping on your way to a new life (like the Oregon Trail, or the family in Grapes of Wrath). There was a wealth of excess equipment after the war, so it was easy to get some supplies, and with the post-war life came opportunity.

The standard for backpacking gear was best summed up by a series of books by Colin Fletcher, titled “The Complete Walker” (1968) in which he laid out and the equipment needed, and his opinion on what was necessary for each. The overall weight of this equipment could be 40-50 lbs + food. It was heavy, bulky, and you get hit it with a bazooka and still keep hiking. Kind of like our “work 45 years, put away 10%-15% and retire at 67” lifestyle.

In 1992, Ray Jardine, a mountain climber by trade and backpacker second, published “Beyond Backpacking: Guide to Lightweight Hiking.” In it, Ray exploded many of the ideas on what was necessary to go backpacking. Instead of an 8 lbs tent, he slept under a 1 lbs tarp, with his backpacking wife – even in sub-freezing temps. He got his base pack-weight down to less than 10 lbs + food/water! With this pack, he and his wife traversed the Pacific Rim trail, and the Appalachian Trail, each 2100+ miles and multiple months of hiking. They did 30+ mile days, in part because they had such light packs. The speed was impressive – like those who retire in less than 20 years because they live frugally and maximize their savings.

Ray concentrated on getting rid of all sorts of weight (he cut off straps from the pack and cut up maps so they only showed what he needed to know). Very similar to the “latte factor” folks who look to cut out many of the extravagancies of life. Yet his big contribution was in how he cut the big three heavyweight items – the pack, the tent, and the sleeping bag. By changing/making lighter weight items, he was able to dramatically cut weight (almost 20 lbs) from a typical 1970s/80’s backpacker.

In the FIRE world, our budgeting deals with three real heavyweights as well:

  1. Housing: Typically, the #1 cost for us. Be it homes or rent, this is the thing you need to look at in order to get your budget under control and reduced. That is why you see so many FIRE folks talk about downsizing, or living in sites much smaller than the average home. This is probably the best thing you can do in order to become financially independent.
  2. Transportation: Having multiple car loans, and purchasing top of the line cars every 3 years is a definite killer. While Mrs. 39 Months and I have had car loans for our vehicles, we have worked to pay them off early, and we have never bought a “luxury” automobile. Since paying off the last loan backin 2009, we have saved money in order to purchase our next one, and we have sufficient funds set aside to do that. While we tend to purchase new, we then drive the cars until the give out – literally. I have owned four cars in my life, counting my current one, and 2 of them I have had to have towed when they gave out. That was when I bought another one.
  3. Food: The third big heavyweight of money in most folks budget. In today’s world, I see an awful lot of people dining out, ordering in, or having someone else bring their groceries to them. While the convenience is nice, we tend to eat out only once a week (a treat for us on Friday) and cook the rest of our meals. I bring lunch to work, instead of going out, and Mrs. 39 Months makes breakfast for herself each morning, rather than getting it on the road. Our overall budget is rather large for two people in comparison to some FI folks ($400/month) but that is what makes us happy.

Note: I did not included taxes, which often ranks up there as well. While there are some tax strategies you can use to reduce this, I see this as primarily something you just have to “live with” and do what you can. It doesn’t count for me in terms of things you can have major impacts on.

I hope you are all working on your “top 3” and furthering your path towards FI.

Mr. 39 Months

Frugal Win – getting gifts out early

         

Like most folks in the US today, I’m separated from my family by some significant distance. The closest family is 1 hour away, Mrs. 39 Months is 3 hours, and mine is 10+hours. We are scattered all up & down the Eastern seaboard – and we are starting to go out West (Utah). As you can expect, sending out Christmas presents can be a daunting (and expensive) task.

Typically, we end up not assembling our gifts until last minute, so that, in order to get them to the family on time, I have to spend a lot of money to pack & ship them(hundreds of $). For the most part, I have simply acknowledged that this is the way it is.

However, this year I have a business trip the week before the holiday weekend, so if we didn’t get it out this last week, then I pretty much had to accept the fact that it was going to arrive after the holidays. Instead, both Mrs. 39 Months and I worked to get everything purchase, made, boxed up & wrapped by the middle of last week. Then I could get it shipped out before having to head out on my trip.

Surprise, if you do this, then you can use the US Post Office and cheaper UPS ground to ship out.Overall, my shipment costs were less than $100 for the year, vs. $250+ for most years. That is with a significant larger number of packages going out (family is scattering more, as the nieces/nephews leave college and start into their first jobs).

So if you can plan early (and most FIRE folks are significant planners) then you should be able to save yourself some money on shipping for the holidays!

So how are you further saving money this holiday season?

Mr. 39 Months