Financial Independence and Stoicism

Some things are in our control, while others are not. We control our opinion, choice, desire, aversion, and in a word, everything of our own doing. We don’t control our body, property, reputation, position, and, in a word, everything not of our own doing. Even more, the things in our control are by nature free, unhindered, and unobstructed, while those not in our control are weak, slavish, can be hindered, and are not our own.” Epictetus

Anyone who has read some of Tim Ferris’ work or listen to some of his podcasts know that he is a big fan of stoicism, and often goes over the benefits that can be gained by studying and following the tenets of the philosophy. I have been reading about stoicism for the last year and find that I greatly enjoy and benefit from the readings and practice of it. Contrary to many folks opinion, stoics don’t turn away from the world, the philosophy demands that they engage in it. However, it also asks them to realize how little control they have over events and other people, and to recognize that the only power they have is to control their own actions and emotions. It is here where people get their ideas about folks “behaving stoically.” Stoics can be sad, angry, etc. – but they are taught to recognize the emotions and not act on them without thinking.

I believe the stoic attitude definitely helps with frugality, because stoics are taught to recognize that all of these items are fleeting, and that they really don’t determine a person’s happiness. One of the key stoic exercises is to spend a period of time without something you believe necessary for your life (good food, a smart phone, nice home) so that you can see that, in the grand scheme of things, you can live without most of this stuff. It can make life easier, but it isn’t absolutely necessary.

This month, I chose to give up on sugar for the month (which is really hard, Mr. 39 Months has a definite sweet tooth). I’m on day 3 so far, and I am adapting. I have survived 72 hours without a sugary snack – and I’m not dead.

For those interested, I’d suggest a book titled “A guide to the good life” by William Irvine. It’s an excellent introduction to stoicism.

Mr. 39 Months

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