Labor Day Weekend with the family

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

 

The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed in 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During 1887 four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 more states had adopted the holiday, and on June 28, 1884, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

From US Debt of Labor website

Labor Day is often celebrated as the last day of summer. Many companies change company policy (dress codes, work hours, etc.) after Labor Day.  For many places, kids go back to school after Labor Day (after enjoying their summers off). There is a fashion rule that says you never where white after Labor Day. All of these point to the same thing; the day is a transition time, between one parts of the annual cycle to another.

Like many times of change in your life, folks tend to want to experience it with family and close friends. It’s a time of barbeques, picnics, and dinner conversation. Sometimes the conversations are serious, but most of the times the talk is light and enjoyable.

This week Mrs. 39 Months and I are traveling north to New York to spend time with her family (hence the rest area picture). Her sister is closing in on retirement, and since the two of them are very close, where she ends up relocating (she doesn’t plan to stay in NY) will have some impact on our plans.

I hope all of you have a pleasant and enjoyable weekend!

 

Mr. 39 Months

2 thoughts on “Labor Day Weekend with the family”

  1. One of the weirdest things about early, or I suppose conventional, retirement is that three day weekends become meaningless. Perhaps valueless is a better word because you’ve got an endless supply of seven day weekends every week. If you have a working spouse, working friends or kids at home then it still does have some relevance but only in a “once removed” sense. But I remember how special they seemed when I worked a 9 to 5. I kind of miss that special feeling that three day weekends had now! Of course it is better now but just like being FI makes money seem less important so does having all your time to yourself make time seem less precious.

    1. Yep, kinda like the short time off for Christmas from school as a kid.

      I tell you, this is one of my concerns as we close in on FI – what will it feel like to be that free?

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