Update to draw down strategy – Mar 2018

After going through the health care analysis earlier, I (like so many others) have had to adjust my retirement plans and drawdown strategy to account for Obamacare and changes to it. Like so many others, as well, I will have to continually monitor the situation and make changes. In addition, Mrs. 39 Months looks like she wants to continue to work after we hit FI, but her job probably wouldn’t provide benefits.

The key issue is the provision for subsidies for individuals that do not make more than 4X the poverty level (the poverty level was around $16,000 for 2017). Thus, if your income, before deductions, is $64K or less, you can be eligible for subsidies. This may mean the difference between paying $1,400 a month and $600 a month for the same level of healthcare. Needless to say, if the situation remains the same, I’ll either need to make $64K, or $74K (the $10K necessary to pay the additional medical). I know many folks in the FIRE community knew this, but I thought it was $64K after deductions, not before.

Our initial budget post-retirement, was going to be about $72K, in order to pay for everything, including medical. This would provide for all bills, some travel, and $1K a month each for Mrs. 39 Months and myself in “fun money”/personal expenses. That would push us over the $64K figure. In addition, if Mrs. 39 Months works (earning around $24K), it adds a level of complexity. So how do I “square this circle?”

When we hit FI (27 months from now), we should have the following amounts.

  • Savings: $132K (can spend without having to pay taxes)
  • Deferred Income from work: $179K (when paid out, have to pay taxes on it)
  • Brokerage Account: $94K (can spend about $60K of it without paying taxes. The rest, will be taxable.
  • Inherited IRA from my father: $137K (taxable when we take it out)
  • 401K/IRAs: $546K (taxable + penalty)
  • Roth IRAs: $257K (non-taxable)
  • Total: $1,345K liquid assets
  • House: $298K (not depending on it unless absolutely necessary, i.e. no reverse mortgage)

Complications

  • Mrs. 39 Months making $24K/year. Have to start from there
  • Inherited IRA will force us to take around $6K a year
  • When I leave company, I have to start taking my deferred amount. I believe I get to stretch it over 5 years, but that still winds up as a minimum of $36K a year

As you can see, I’m already up to $60K, without the ability to alter it. How do I get to $72K of income, without going over the $64K of taxable income?

Options

  1. Use the money in my brokerage account by selling some of the stocks there. I would only have to pay for any capital gains on it. Since it looks like about 2/3 of money in it will be basis money, I could take out $12K, and it would only show as $4K of income.
  2. Use some of my Roth IRA money, which is not taxable, to make up for the shortage. Even though I would only be 56 when I hit FIRE, I can still withdraw the money I put in, tax free. However, I am loathe to do this.
  3. Get myself a side gig/part time job to keep myself from going crazy from retirement boredom and pay for the additional medical costs. We will have to see about that.

What is my current plan? I’m going to plan for option 1, and if I get really bored in retirement, I’ll probably shoot for #3, with the understanding that I will be working half of my time just to pay for medical. Like so many others in the US, medical is driving the train!

Of course, all this could change over the next 27 months as we move forward.

So, any changes to your drawdown plans, folks?

 

 

Mr 39 Months
 

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