You gotta have hobbies – sticking mouldings!

I continue to pursue my woodworking hobby, with emphasis on using hand-tools to do a lot of the work. In some ways it is slower than using power tools (ex: when doing repetitive cuts of the same dimension on a table saw). However, for most of the “one-off” items or joinery, the hand tool solution often is faster. It takes a long time to set up a machine to make a cut (initial setup, test cut, adjust, test cut again, adjust…..). When you are doing a few items with one task, it’s often quicker to just pull out a chisel, hand plane or saw, and do it.

It’s often more fun and more quiet as well. I can do this at 6am on a Saturday, or 10pm on a weeknight. I get the thrill of producing something by hand, and being able to see it in my home constantly. I urge everyone to pick up a couple of hobbies so they can improve their skills and gainfully occupy their time – instead of just sitting in front of the TV.

Most homes have mouldings in place. These are the pieces of wood around doors, edges, or places where two planes meet (between ceiling and walls, floor and walls, etc.  They are mostly used to reduce damage and wear at key points in the house which might suffer too many dings and hits. For some home styles, like Victorians, the moulding/trim was quite extensive.

The way these are made nowadays, for the most part, is by running the wood pieces through a powered machine called a shaper, or in some instances on a router table (a less-powered version of the shaper). You can often buy large lengths of specific trim pieces at Home Depot/Lowes, or get special trim pieces made by a lumberyard/specialty shop. This makes sense, because once you set the machine up, you can run large amounts over the time, and get economies of scale.

Before the age of powered equipment, the way this trim was produced was with a “sticking board” and moulding planes – wooden planes with profiles ground into them to cut the trim the way you wanted it. The joiner/woodworker would start at one end and run the plane down the length, taking off some of the wood and then go back. As he continued to run it down, the profile would take shape until eventually it reached the final version. Some wooden planes had a built in “depth stop” on the plane, a section of the plane which would prevent it from cutting any deeper once the final shape had been reached. After that, the trim would be cut to size and installed, just like it is today.

Well, I’ve recently built my sticking board (some straight lengths of wood with screws on the end to hold the wood trim pieces) and had built a cove moulding plane (the light brown item you see) and tried it out. It was a lot of fun, and some good exercise. While not really great cardio, it certainly forced me to do some walking in the shop.

I’m satisfied with the results. I intend to use it to build some frames for two posters I got on our vacation to the Redwoods and Crater Lake National Park. We’ll see what other things I can make with this setup in the future.

How have your hobbies gone?

 

Mr. 39 Months

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