Investment Update June 2021

Well the market and our investments continue to move up overall, with the typical ups & downs by investment class. We continue to be on track with what we are looking to add in 2021, and our allocation plan has not really changed. Like a lot of folks in the FIRE community, once you get everything set up, automated and regular, it gets a little boring. Kinda “Steady as she goes.”

Our allocation remains pretty much the same as when I set it back at the beginning of the year, and back in 2020:

  • 20% Bond Index Fund
  • 20% S&P500 Index Fund
  • 20% International Index Fund
  • 20% Small Cap Index Fund
  • 20% REIT Index Fund

My 401K doesn’t have REIT option, so it’s just 25% for each.

Overall, our investment classes performed as follows:

  • Bonds were up about 0.7%
  • S&P was up 0.7%%
  • International was ups 3.2%%
  • Small Cap up 0.1%
  • REIT Index up 0.8%

I also have a Vanguard value fund (VVIAX) where I put in my after-tax investment money. That was up 2.9% for the month. I’ve been seeing a lot of articles of Value funds and ETFs doing better than the S&P500 – I guess we’ll see. I may do some additional research and write about this in the future.

My dividend account new allocation (as of Jan 2020) was:

  • 50% Dividend Stocks
  • 50% REITs

The dividend paying stocks were up an average of 1.8%, and the REITS were down an average of -1.6%, so we’re roughly even for the month of May.

One of the things I did this month was shift my automatic investment amount from my Vanguard Value fund to savings. Its my intention to do a Roth conversion of some funds from my regular IRA to my Roth by the end of the year – because I believe taxes are going up in 2022. I want to try to shift as much as possible into the ROTH, and I’ll be using the money I normally put into investments to pay the taxes on the conversion.

Hope everyone is healthy and your market returns for the rest of the year go up!

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Mr. 39 Months

Quarterly Update – Apr 2021

Well, it’s mid-April, and the year has started out fairly well, all things considered. While the Chinese Flu continues to cause concern and create issues throughout the country, for the most part it appears the economy has continued to move forward, markets have stabilized, and the world moves on. There are still a lot of issues out there, but hopefully we are turning the corner.

My Goals for 2021 (some financial, some not):

Finance:

  • Save $29K in tax-advantaged accounts – 401K, and Roth IRA.  Grade A. Saved $4.1K in our 401Ks for the 1st qtr. Plan to put my $14K bonus into the Roth in 4th Qtr once I know my tax status.
  • Save $41K in regular accounts.  Grade A. Good start.
  • Increase dividend income from all accounts to $27K/year (compared to 29K in 2019). Grade C. Dividends are down for the year in the major accounts/mutual funds. Was only able to put $5.8K in for 3rd qtr, which leaves me at $17.6K for the year. Unless 4th qtr is a “gang buster” dividend time, I won’t hit it.
  • Passive income covers 38% of base living expenses in retirement, estimated at $78K per year. Grade C, covered 23% of 1st qtr. However, my 401K and Deferred don’t report dividends separately, and usually 1st qtr isn’t a heavy dividend quarter. We will see.
  • Beat net worth growth rate of 7%. Grade A, because we’re up almost 3% / $70K for the year already.  

Business:

  • Attend twelve SJREIA meetings. Grade A; I’ve attended six already, just in the first quarter. My local market is pretty heated (like so many others). Still, its good to get the information.
  • Double the number of blog visitors in 2020. Grade F. Still not a large number of folks reading – maybe a little bump from last year.  
  • Sell $1,000 on TKD Woodworking (my side-hustle name). Grade: Incomplete. Website is up and running, I’ve tested the e-Com, and it appears to be fully functional. I’ve got two reservations at a local craft fair/farmer’s market. We’ll see how it goes.
  • Setup funding for TKD homes. Plan to get into real estate means setting up funding. While I’ve got a significant amount of money set aside to start this, I also need to explore additional funding methods.
  • Write/publish a book on finance.  Grade F: Haven’t done anything on this for a whole year. Not sure how to reboot this – need to try.

Personal:

  • Regular Workouts with Gymanstic Bodies internet system: Grade A: I’ve gone through all the starter programs. Almost ready to start on their phase I program.
  • Average 2 hours of cardio per week, which is about what I’m doing now. Grade A. Walking daily, so hitting this.
  • Backpack over 100 miles on AT (did around 50 miles in 2020). Grade: Incomplete. Actually just got back from 4-days, 29.8 miles in Virginia, so I’m off to a great start.
  • Continue volunteering at Pennsbury Manor at their joiner’s shop (woodworking). Really enjoyed this. Incomplete. Site is still closed down
  • Reduce weight by 15 lbs. from Jan 2020 Again, I want to get in better shape as I get closer to financial independence. Grade B. I’m down 3 lbs in first quarter, but still have a long way to go, and the virus is keeping me from eating as healthy as I’d like.
  • Read at least one book a month. I surpassed this goal in 2018, and re-learned the joy of reading. Grade A. Six books in first quarter alone and I really enjoy it.

Travel:

  • Visit one national parks (that is the plan, right now). Grade: Incomplete
  • Visit family in Tennessee, Vermont and New York. Family is very important to me. One of the things I am looking forward to with financial independence is the opportunity to visit family more often. Need to get up to see my brother in Vermont. Grade: Incomplete
  • A week with Mrs. 39 Months for our 35th anniversary. Grade: Incomplete
  • Visit Ellis Island. Still want to do this – its so close. As 50% Czech from immigrant great grandparents from the turn of the century, I believe they went through there, and I want to see it. Grade F. Cancelled.

How did your first quarter go this year?

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Mr. 39 Months.

Should you plan for inflation in 2021?

There have been talks for the last several years about the potential for inflation, and the effects it would have on individuals spending, investments and lifestyle. The inflation rate has jumped around significantly throughout the 20th century, and it wasn’t until Reagan and Volker (in the 1980s) took the steps to “slay the inflation dragon” and get it to a more controlled level, without the wild swings in the past (it went from 4.7% in 1976 to 13.3% in 1979!).

Since the 1991, the inflation rate has stayed under 4% every year, and average around 2% for the last two decades. Whole generations have grown up without the threat of watching their purchasing power melt away over a short period of time. Some argue that the CPI (Consumer Price Index) is not measuring accurately, and that the key items for living (shelter, food, transportation, etc.) have been going up at a much higher rate than the CPI index shows. This is similar to the Monevator’s article on personal inflation rate I noted earlier in the year.

Now with the huge amount of government spending over the last year (added to the large amount of government spending since the 2008-2009 crash) has led to renewed articles on the potential for inflation in 2021 and its effects. Stocks continue to rise well above all levels of base P/E ratios, and more people are talking about a bubbles. So what can you do?

I’ve written before about having a SHTF plan and what you can do to prepare. The key is to look at the items that will increase in value, and do things to ward off the effects of rising prices.

  • Invest in stocks vs. Bonds. Bond rates typically don’t keep up with inflation rates, so you can lose buying power, while the stock price of companies tend to go up at a better rate
  • Invest in hard assets to hedge (gold, oil, etc.). As the purchasing power of a dollar goes down, these items will increase in value.
  • Real Estate: Inflation typically makes real estate values shoot up (see house prices in the 70s). They’re already on the rise now – which lends to the belief that we are already experiencing inflation

The last bit of advice I have in regards to this is the opposite of what you typically should do in times of high inflation. The base suggestion would be to take out loans (especially low interest loans) with today’s dollars, and then when the dollar inflates, you can pay the debt off with lower value dollars. My suggestion in times of high inflation is to pay off your debt – not take on more. High inflation times are uncertain times, and job losses and economic disruptions happen. Having little or no debt will help you to weather through these tough times.

My hope is that we don’t see anything major happen in the next decade or so. However, I am very concerned at the out of control spending at the federal level. It just isn’t sustainable.

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Mr. 39 Months

Investment Update Jan 2021 – they did it again!

If you remember, at the end of last month, I noted that the market appeared to take a small dive right at the end of the month. In January, the market dropped about $40K in the last week, leaving me from a +3.0% to a -0.5% return for the month.

In February, I checked the market on Thursday, Feb 25th in the morning, less than 36 hours before then end of the month, and I was ups over 5% for the month. Yeah, baby! By Saturday morning, however, when I went to check it, the market had dropped close to 3% again, and I was only up 2.8% for the month. Still up over $41K, but not the $70K plus that it was on Thursday. They did it again!

In talking with some folks in the community, we all agreed that it was madness to be checking the market continuously. It is s also to be noted that all these gains/losses are just paper gains/losses. Until you sell the stock/mutual funds/ETFs, its all on paper, so it doesn’t do you any good to cry over a loss or crow over a gain. Just track it and see how it does over time.

So how did I do for the month of January? Overall, pretty good.

My allocation remains pretty much the same as when I set it back in July 2020:

  • 20% Bond Index Fund
  • 20% S&P500 Index Fund
  • 20% International Index Fund
  • 20% Small Cap Index Fund
  • 20% REIT Index Fund

My 401K doesn’t have REIT option, so it’s just 25% for each.

  • Bonds were down about -1.8%
  • S&P was up 2.8%
  • International was ups 2.3%
  • Small Cap up 6.1%
  • REIT Index up 3.4%

I also have a Vanguard value fund (VVIAX) where I put in my after-tax investment money. That was up 5.0% for the month. Maybe 2021 will finally be the year value investing starts beating the growth stocks? Who knows.

My dividend account new allocation (as of Jan 2020) was:

  • 50% Dividend Stocks
  • 50% REITs

The dividend paying stocks were up an average of 1.5%, and the REITS were up an average of 3%. These specific REITs really starting paying off in February, after a couple of months of almost nothing. It will be interesting seeing them in the months ahead.

Again, wow. The dividend account has been down all year and hasn’t recovered anywhere near what the 401K/IRA accounts have. Now its come roaring back. Hopefully it will end the year in the black.

Again, my intention is not to alter my asset allocation or “get out of stocks” but I am mentally preparing myself for a very bumpy 2021.  As I stated in January, I think the market is overvalued right now. We will see.

Hope everyone is healthy and your market returns for the rest of the year go up!

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Mr. 39 Months

Investment Update Jan 2021 – the market makes you go Oof!

Over the last several months, I have learned something interesting for those of us in the final stages of getting to FI. When the market “sneezes” you may freak out.

When we were younger and had a smaller amount of money in the market (say $100K total in 401K, IRA, investments, etc) a market drop of 2% – 3% (which is fairly normal) would cost us $2K – $3K that day. While its money, its not the sort of thing that gets your stomach turning over. You knew that long-term, the market will go up. Just “buy and hold” baby!

Well, fast forward 10+ years and we’re coming in for a landing on the FI runway! At the beginning of the year, we had $1.46M in our various investments, and hoped to get up to $1.6M by year-end with what we were putting in and market advances. Yay!

A week before the end-of-month I checked, and we were up around 3% for the month, so over $40K while continuing to work at our current jobs. Looking good? I should have known better, because every time I check a little before month end, I end up regretting it. This was no different.  

For the month, we’re off $0.45%, or roughly a $6.2K loss. Not too hideous (especially compared to 1st qtr 2020) but a far cry from up 3%. We saw almost $50K of value evaporate in the space of 4-5 trading days. As the folks at Stacking Benjamins have noted in the past, it really does make a difference when the market drops and you lose 5-6 figures vs. a few thousand (or hundred). It shakes you.

I’ve spoken earlier how I think stocks are currently overpriced and due for a serious correction (20%?). I have to prepare myself that, if that happens, I’m going to see $280K of my money evaporate like that! I don’t want to leave  the market – I’m just not a market timer. So I’ll have to just prepare myself and soldier on if it happens.

For the month, some items performed OK, others “not so much”

S&P500: -1.0%

REITs: +0.2%

Small Cap: +2.8%

International: 0.0%

Bonds: -1.0%

My dividend account (dividend stocks and REITs) was down about -0.9%.

Again, my intention is not to alter my asset allocation or “get out of stocks” but I am mentally preparing myself for a very bumpy 2021.

Hope everyone is healthy and your market returns for the rest of the year go up!

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Mr. 39 Months

What do you do at the beginning of the new year?

So it seems everyone has their own method/ideas for closing out the old year and starting the new one. There are “new years resolutions” and lists of financial and personal decisions to review and update. I find this time of year fascinating on the FIRE blogs, because you really get a chance to see where people are, how their decisions throughout the year “panned out” and what their thoughts on for the new year. Hopefully you’ll write and share yours.

For me, I typically start out my review where I’m most comfortable – the numbers! As an engineer and a FIRE guy, I enjoy looking at my spreadsheets and investments to see where I am and to plan for the future. So what do I do with my finances?

  1. Update Investment status: I track my investments monthly, and at the end of the year, I determine, for each investment, its overall growth and its percentage in my overall portfolio.
  2. Calculate dividends: I also take the opportunity for each investment to determine its dividend yield and the amount of “passive” income it has thrown off. I use this for planning the potential for retirement income in the future.
  3. Individual Investment Performance: Determine if I need to sell/buy new investments, based on performance.
  4. Updated Net Worth: Adding all of this together with my real assets (home, cars, side hustle) and our liquid assets (checking & savings) I determine our net worth, and the growth of our net worth in the past year
  5. Determine rebalancing moves/stock sales & purchases: Finally I look at each investment and what its overall percentage is in the portfolio – and then determine if I need to buy/sell items to bring everything in line (I also rebalance in the middle of the year).

With all this done, I have a better idea of where we are financially, and where we are in relation to our goals.

At this point, I turn to the “softer” items on my new year review

  1. Review previous years goals: In addition to financial goals, I’ve got a long list of goals that I was working on (fitness, reading, traveling, visits to family, etc.) I try to put real numbers or performance measures on each, so I can actually grade myself on accomplishing/not-accomplishing them.
  2. Review 5-minute journals from past year for insight: Like so many others, I use a journal on a daily basis to write about my thoughts and feelings (I use the five-minute journal). I go back and review my writing for any insights.
  3. Go through “Year End Review” list of question: I have a “year end review” list of questions I picked up from my reading that I do at the beginning of the year, that I reflect back on weekly. The idea is to answer these questions and reflect on them
  • Identify 20% of people, projects or ideas which provided 80% of enjoyment/powerful emotions for 2018
  • Identify 20% of people, projects or ideas which provided 80% of stress/pain/powerful emotions for 2018
  • Try and spot patterns from #1 and #2; Determine action steps to increase #1 and reduce #2:
  • Identify Three things to add to my life
  • Identify Three things to remove from my life
  • Ask folks close to you, what you should do more of and what should you do less of?
  • Start putting stuff into the calendar. If it is on the calendar, we will do it
  • Questions from “Happy Money”.
    • For Purchases, “how will this affect my use of time”
    • “How will I use this thing on Tuesday night”
    • $100 to most increase happiness?
    • $500 to increase happiness?
    • $1000 to increase happiness?
    • Take 20% of liquid cash, how would you apply it to increase your quality of life?

I then set new goals for new year: Based on all this, I go and set new goals for the year, and then post them where I can reflect back on them regularly

So what do you do for your year-end review?

Other Bloggers on the topic

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Mr. 39 Months

Investment Update Dec 2020 – What a difference a month makes!

Wow. Just Wow.

Not sure whether it’s the announcement of a potential vaccine, or the election being over, the market took all its pent-up energy and exploded. The investments were up across the board, and I’m sure everyone benefited from their investments shooting up. The result for us was an overall 10.7% increase in our accounts, and our annual number being pushed back into the “black” and the annual return rising to 7.53%. Maybe the year isn’t a total loss.

So our allocation is as follows, as of July 2020:

  • 20% Bond Index Fund
  • 20% S&P500 Index Fund
  • 20% International Index Fund
  • 20% Small Cap Index Fund
  • 20% REIT Index Fund

My 401K doesn’t have REIT option, so it’s just 25% for each.

  • Bonds were up 1.1%
  • S&P was up 10.9%
  • International was ups 13.0%
  • Small Cap up 16.9%
  • REIT Index up 10.1%

My dividend account new allocation (as of Jan 2020) was:

  • 50% Dividend Stocks
  • 50% REITs

The dividend paying stocks were up an average of 12.5%, and the REITS were up an average of 19.8%. Again, wow. The dividend account has been down all year and hasn’t recovered anywhere near what the 401K/IRA accounts have. Now its come roaring back. Hopefully it will end the year in the black.

I hope December is at least level, so that we can end the year in the black.

Hope everyone is healthy and your market returns for the rest of the year go up!

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Mr. 39 Months

Investment Update Nov 2020 – Two months in a row, I’m down

Well, October is typically a down month, or a month when the market has crashes (1929, 1987, etc.) so I shouldn’t be surprised. Still, when I checked my investments a week before month-end and I was up about 1.5%. Then the bottom dropped out, and I ended up being down 1.5% for the month. Ouch!

The drop was spread out pretty much across all my allocation, with the S&P500 down 2.7%, International down 3.8% and REITS down. What was interesting was that small cap was up about 2%. For a decade the S&P500 was killing small cap. Maybe it’s turning?

So our allocation is as follows, as of July 2020:

Retirement Accounts: Remember, my allocation for these is:

  • 20% Bond Index Fund
  • 20% S&P500 Index Fund
  • 20% International Index Fund
  • 20% Small Cap Index Fund
  • 20% REIT Index Fund

My 401K doesn’t have REIT option, so it’s just 25% for each.

My dividend account new allocation (as of Jan 2020) was:

  • 50% Dividend Stocks
  • 50% REITs

The dividend paying stocks varied, but most were down. Overall, the account was down -5.9%. My value account with Vanguard was down -2.1%, so it was in line with most of the stock losses.

October pushed me further into negative numbers for the year. I’m now at -3.3% for the year. As I noted back in October,  I’m assuming we’ll gain some/all of that back for the year, and end 2020 about where we started.

Hope everyone is healthy and your market returns for the rest of the year go up!

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Mr. 39 Months

Dividend Account results – 3rd Qtr 2020

Sorry I didn’t post over the weekend. Went backpacking up in New Hampshire, where it dropped down to 32 degrees with a 15 mph wind blowing. Made the hike a little more “exciting” than I wanted.

As noted back in April, I altered my Dividend/Income account to reduce the bond allocation to 0, and increased the dividend stocks and REITS to a 50/50 split. The idea was to increase my dividend yield, as bonds had been performing poorly for the 3+ years that I had been using them. With Interest rates the way they appear to be, I don’t see bonds performing that well in the near future.

The first quarter was somewhat successful (an 18.7% increase in dividend $) but a real bust as far as value (I dropped almost 30% in value) due to the market volatility. Yield was up to 6.13%, but this was primarily due to a drop in the underlying value of the investments. For the second quarter, the investments recovered somewhat, and my yield dropped won to 4.67%. The actual $ amount of dividends for 2020 vs. 2019 was just about even.

For the third quarter, the value of the underlying investments has gone up about 2% (still not where they were at the beginning of the year) and the dividend payments are only 3% higher than the same period last year. A slight improvement.

stockDetailsInvestment valueYieldDividend
CATCaterpillar$7,457.502.76%$51.50
CVXChevron$3,600.007.17%$64.50
CSCOCisco Systems$5,908.503.66%$54.00
DOWDow$4,705.005.95%$70.00
XOMExxon Mobil$3,433.0010.14%$87.00
HRHealthcare Realty$15,060.003.98%$150.00
IBMInternational Business Machines$6,084.005.36%$81.50
PFFiShares$12,029.005.39%$162.04
PFEPfizer$5,505.004.14%$57.00
ORealty Income Corp (REIT)$12,150.004.61%$140.10
SVCServices PPTYS TR$4,770.000.50%$6.00
MMM3M Company$6,407.003.67%$58.80
UMHUMH Properties$14,894.005.32%$198.00
VZVerizon$5,949.004.14%$61.50
WBAWalgreens$3,592.005.21%$46.75
$111,544.004.62%$1,288.69

Again, if I was using the account to live off the dividends, I could “let it ride” and let the investments build back up, while spending the dividends. I believe the “jury is still out” on whether the shift to stocks & REITS was a good decision or not. With the current US Fed and its interest rates, I don’t think Bonds will be a good return any time soon – unless you are willing to go into some very risky bonds. If I had additional capital, I might invest more here, as I think these dividend stocks are undervalued.

Let’s see how the 4th quarter goes.

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Mr. 39 Months

Quarterly Update on Goals – Oct 2020

Well, it’s early October, and while I’m down for the year in my investments, I still think I’ll end the year OK, maybe a little up. I think there is a lot of uncertainty in the market right now re: the US elections, and that will all be sorted out int he next 30 days. Once that is done, hopefully we will continue moving forward.

The Chinese Corona Virus is still around, still causing issues, but I’m also hopeful that its affects on the economy will continue to recede. We will see.

My Goals for 2020 (some financial, some not):

Finance:

  • Save $28K in tax-advantaged accounts – 401K, and Roth IRA.  Grade A. Saved $3.5K in our 401Ks for the 3rd qtr, bringing my 401K total to $11.2K. Plan to put my $14K bonus into the Roth in 4th Qtr once I know my tax status.
  • Save $41K in regular accounts (compared to $5K in 2019). Grade A. We’ve saved $43K for the year. Remaining money goes into paying for the Roth IRA.
  • Increase dividend income from all accounts to $27K/year (compared to 29K in 2019). Grade C. Dividends are down for the year in the major accounts/mutual funds. Was only able to put $5.8K in for 3rd qtr, which leaves me at $17.6K for the year. Unless 4th qtr is a “gang buster” dividend time, I won’t hit it.
  • Passive income covers 30% of base living expenses in retirement, estimated at $78K per year (previously, I was using $72K, but after meetings with our finance guy and Mrs. 39 Months, the budget ended up being $78K).  Grade A. Currently running at 30.1%. My long-term goal is to get my dividend/passive income up to where it covers over 100% of my expected retirement living expenses, so my investments can continue to grow.
  • Beat net worth growth rate of 6% (it was +20.1% in 2019 with the stock market run up). Grade D. Like most folks, my Net Worth hasn’t moved much. While I’m down in my investments for the year, since I continue to dollar-cost-average in, my net worth is up 2.4% – but unless the market really turns, I don’t think I’ll hit my historical 6% this year.

Business:

  • While not getting a membership, I wanted to attend six (6) of my local real estate investors association meetings this year. Grade A. My local real estate group has had free online meetings, at least 2X a month, and I’ve attended eight already. Going to continue to do this, and I’ll probably join permanently in2021.
  • Double the number of blog visitors in 2020. Last year it was a little over 6,000. I want to get at least 12,000 this year, so I need to put myself out there more (i.e. comment) and write interesting topics. My thanks to everyone who stopped by, and I try to return the favor, and comment as well. Grade F. Not seeing a real jump on this – If anything, it’s a bit of a drop. Need to get out in the community more.
  • Create TKD Woodworking (my side-hustle name) with an LLC, website, finance tracking, etc. Sort of a trial method for running businesses. Grade B. Incorporated it, built 5 products, established a website (basic one) and began selling on Etsy. Due to the Virus, haven’t been able to do any trade shows. Still, coming along.
  • Make $1,000 in sales (not necessarily profit) on items with TKD woodworking. Grade F. Haven’t sold anything yet.
  • Write/publish a book on finance.  I wrote one for new graduates in 2017, but I have identified an area of the community which hasn’t been served as well in the past. Hopefully I can assist with something here.  I’ve got the first five chapters outlined/partially done, but still have a ways to go. Grade F. With all this extra time, you’d think I could make progress on this. A little lazy I guess.

Personal:

  • Increase weight lifted by 10% from 2019. Was able to exceed this in 2019, need to continue to push it. Grade F. Jumped up about 7% in 1st qtr, but haven’t been lifting due to the Chinese Corona Virus. In September, I went to the online training system called Gynmastic bodies. Looking to get better with that since I can’t go to the gym now.
  • Average 2 hours of cardio per week, which is about what I’m doing now. Grade A. Walking daily, so hitting this.
  • Backpack over 90 miles on AT (did around 80 miles in 2019). The trail that I haven’t hiked is getting further and further away, making it impossible to do weekend trips. Going to get harder. Did 40 miles in August, have 18 miles this month and another 30 scheduled for November. Grade B.
  • Continue volunteering at Pennsbury Manor at their joiner’s shop (woodworking). Really enjoyed this. Incomplete. Site is closed down
  • Reduce weight by 20 lbs. from Jan 2019 (lost 2 lbs. in 2019). Again, I want to get in better shape as I get closer to financial independence. Grade C. I’m down 8 lbs in first 3 quarters, but still have a long way to go, and the virus is keeping me from eating as healthy as I’d like.
  • Read at least one book a month. I surpassed this goal in 2018, and re-learned the joy of reading. Grade A. Seventeen (17) books so far and I really enjoy it.

Travel:

  • Visit three national parks (that is the plan, right now). Grade F. No vacations this year.
  • Visit family in Tennessee, Vermont and New York. Family is very important to me. One of the things I am looking forward to with financial independence is the opportunity to visit family more often. Need to get up to see my brother in Vermont. Grade B. Visited Vermont and Tennessee. Just need to see family in New York now.
  • Take a week at the shore and just relax with family. Currently planned for July, but we’ll see how many family members can come. Grade F. Cancelled.
  • Visit Ellis Island. Still want to do this – its so close. As 50% Czech from immigrant great grandparents from the turn of the century, I believe they went through there, and I want to see it. Grade F. Cancelled.

How did your third quarter go this year?

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Mr. 39 Months.