So what are you thankful for?

It’s that wonderful time of year in the US, when we get in cars, drive for hours, sleep on inflatable beds or fold-out couches, and then stuff ourselves with turkey and stuffing, before falling asleep on the couch while watching football. In truth, it is supposed to be the time of year when you reflect back on a bountiful harvest and all the good things that happened to you and your loved ones throughout the year, and gives thanks for it. Often folks seem to have a difficult time throughout the year counting their benefits, and only at the end of the year do they spend any time reflecting back. This is a mistake.

This year, I have been filling out a 5-minute journal, which is a daily journal with specific things to fill out in the morning and in the evening. The idea being that this will help prepare you for the day (what are you grateful for, what thing would make the day successful, daily affirmation) and clear you mind at the end of the day (what went well, what would have made the day even better). It’s also full of motivational quotes and small tasks to do weekly.

The biggest benefit to it, in my mind, is its requirement to list out three things daily that you are grateful for. It can be silly things (grateful for a warm bed) or profound (grateful for the friends that I have around me), but it makes you remember to be grateful every day.

I’ve also started reading about Stoic philosophy. Yes, go ahead and get it out – I listen to Tim Ferris podcasts and sometimes take his advice on certain things. Sue me. One of the best books I’ve read is A Guide to the Good Life by William Irvine. He describes the ancient history of the Stoics, and then shows how to apply their teachings to modern life.

One of the key parts of Stoic philosophy is to imagine the bad things that can happen to you in life, and then think about how you can react and continue to live, even if these happen. The purpose is not just to steel yourself against the evils of the world, but to appreciate what you have. In discussions on death, they teach to think that this moment might be your last, or this might be the last time you see a friend. This is so you can truly value the time you have, the people you live with, the food you eat.

So don’t just value your friends, family and life once a year. Value them constantly and give thanks now.

 

Mr. 39 Months

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